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University of Pittsburgh    
 
    
 
  Sep 19, 2017
 
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog

Swanson School of Engineering



The Swanson School of Engineering’s undergraduate programs prepare students for entrance into a diverse spectrum of careers, providing both a strong, fundamental engineering education and a thorough understanding of the broader aspects of society. Students have an opportunity to participate in the highly successful Cooperative Engineering Education Program, an increasing number of study abroad opportunities, joint programs with the University Honors College, and a number of certificate programs. Students also have the option of earning a minor or a dual degree from various Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences programs. Minors may also be earned from the other Swanson School of Engineering undergraduate degree programs. The curricula provide sufficient flexibility to allow graduates to pursue careers in industry, government, or education, including programs in medicine, law, or business.

Full-time Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree programs are offered on the Pittsburgh campus in the following engineering disciplines: bioengineering, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, engineering science, environmental, industrial, materials science, and mechanical. Special interdisciplinary programs can be structured based upon individual student interest and ability through the engineering science program. The Cooperative Engineering Education Program, in which students alternate terms of relevant work experience with course work, is available for students in all undergraduates. Approximately half of the graduating seniors complete at least three co-op rotations. There are also certificate programs in nuclear engineering; innovation, product design and entrepreneurship; product realization; supply chain management; mining engineering; engineering for humanities; international engineering studies; engineering simulation in design; and sustainable engineering.

Contact Information

Prospective First Year & Transfer Students

University of Pittsburgh
Swanson School of Engineering
First Year Engineering Program
152 Benedum Hall
3700 O’Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA  15261
412-624-9825
ssoefrsh@pitt.edu

Academic Issues

University of Pittsburgh
Swanson School of Engineering
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
152 Benedum Hall
3700 O’Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA  15261
412-624-9815
pjr10@pitt.edu

Administrative Issues

University of Pittsburgh
Swanson School of Engineering
Office of Administration
151 Benedum Hall
3700 O’Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15261
412-624-9800
ssoeadm@engr.pitt.edu

Application Procedures

The Swanson School of Engineering works closely with the University of Pittsburgh’s Office of Admissions and Financial Aid (OAFA). Ultimately, all admissions, financial aid and scholarship decisions take place through OAFA following the procedures detailed below:

First Year Engineering Applicants

All admissions to the Swanson School of Engineering are determined by the University’s Office of Admissions and Financial Aid. (Please see Pittsburgh Campus Freshman Admissions section of this bulletin for details.) Approximately 550 first year students enter the Swanson School of Engineering each fall term.

Transfer Students from Other Colleges and Universities

The Swanson School of Engineering admits transfer students from within the University system, and from other U.S. and international programs.  Approximately a third of the students receiving the BSE degree transferred into the school. Transfer applicants are evaluated according to their academic record and potential for completing the particular engineering program, and conditional upon space available in the program of choice. An applicant for transfer to the Swanson School of Engineering from another college or university should request a transfer application from the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid.

Contact the First Year Engineering Program at 412-624-9825 or see the transfer engineering students’ Web site http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/First-Year/First-Year/Transfer-Students/Prospective-Transfer-Students/ for more information on transfer procedures.

A transfer applicant from a four-year college should have a grade point average (GPA) of at least a 3.000 (for courses that satisfy Swanson School of Engineering’s first-year requirements) on a 4.000 scale to be considered for admissions. Applicants from a two-year college should have a minimum GPA of a 3.250 on a 4.000 scale.  Students interested in the Bioengineering program need a minimum of 3.500 GPA. Students must also have completed two semesters of Calculus, Calculus-based Physics and Chemistry for consideration. In general transfer students will only be accepted for the upcoming Fall Term except for special cases of well prepared applicants. 

All transfer applicants are required to provide SAT I critical reading and mathematics scores and high school academic records. Advanced standing credits will be granted for college course work at another accredited institution depending on grades received and on the relevance of the courses to the applicant’s proposed program in the Swanson School of Engineering. Only courses in which the applicant received at least a C (2.000 on a 4.000 scale) will be considered for transfer and then only if the courses are an integral part of the proposed degree program.

Transfer Students from another University of Pittsburgh Oakland Campus School

Most transfer applicants from other Pittsburgh campus units to the Swanson School of Engineering come from either the Dietrich College of Arts and Sciences (DSAS) or the College of General Studies (CGS), although students from any of the University’s other schools are eligible for transfer if they meet the Swanson School of Engineering’s requirements.

An applicant for transfer from an Oakland campus school must have a minimum 3.000 cumulative GPA (3.500 for Bioengineering) and must have completed no fewer than 7 of the 8 First Year Engineering courses (MATH 0220 and 0230 - Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1 and 2; PHYS 0174 and 0175 - Physics for Science and Engineering 1 and 2; CHEM 0110 and 0120 - General Chemistry 1 and 2; and ENGR 0015 and 0016 Introduction to Engineering Analysis and Introduction to Engineering Computing) to be considered for admission. Completion of all transfer minimum requirements does not guarantee transfer, as space limitations within each degree program will be considered. For additional information, see the transfer engineering students’ Web site at http://engineering.pitt.edu/First-Year/First-Year/Transfer-Students/Internal-Transfer-Students/.

The GPA for students transferring into the Swanson School of Engineering from another school or campus within the University will be recalculated in accordance with the Swanson School of Engineering’s policy.

Regional Campus Students

Request forms for relocation from the pre-engineering programs at the Bradford, Greensburg, or Titusville campuses are available at each regional campus. Pre-engineering students who have a grade point average of 3.000 or higher (with the exception of bioengineering, which requires a 3.500 GPA) in the required engineering curricula are able to relocate pending departmental approval. Completion of all transfer minimum requirements does not guarantee transfer, as space limitations within each major will be considered. Students from the Bradford campus in Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical and Mechanical must complete the first-two years of their degree program before applying to transfer to the Oakland campus.  Students wishing to transfer from the Johnstown campus may only apply for transfer upon completion of UPJ’s first year’s engineering curriculum.

Academic Standing

To be considered in good academic standing, a student’s cumulative grade point average (GPA) must be at least 2.000 and the student must be making satisfactory progress toward earning an engineering degree. A student who is not in good academic standing will be placed on probation and may be subject to suspension or dismissal if his or her cumulative GPA remains below a 2.000 for two consecutive terms (with the exception of first year students). Every engineering student’s academic record is reviewed at the end of each term to certify whether or not the student is in good academic standing. Students will be notified by letter if they are no longer in good academic standing and are on probation.

Students in the First Year Engineering Program who enter in the fall term may be suspended or dismissed from the Swanson School of Engineering if they do not attain a cumulative GPA of 1.750 or greater by the end of the Spring Term.  Typical first term engineering courses are MATH 0220 , PHYS 0174 , CHEM 0960 , AND ENGR 0011  or their equivalents.  Furthermore, First Year Engineering students with cumulative GPA’s between 1.750 and 1.999 by the end of their first academic year who fail to obtain a cumulative GPA of 2.000 by the end of their third term are subject to suspension or dismissal. A similar timeline will apply to students who begin the First Year Engineering program in the spring term.

After being suspended, students are not eligible to re-enroll for one calendar year, after which they are required to apply for reinstatement through the Swanson School of Engineering Office of Administration. Students returning from academic suspension are reinstated on academic probation and their academic performance will be reviewed after each subsequent term. If the student’s cumulative GPA remains below 2.000 for two consecutive terms, he or she will be subject to dismissal. Dismissal is a final action. Dismissed students are not eligible to be reinstated to the University of Pittsburgh.

Students may only repeat a course twice. Any student who fails to successfully complete a required course three times will be dismissed from the Swanson School even if his or her GPA is 2.000 or higher.

Advanced Standing for Courses Taken Outside the University

Students transferring into the Swanson School of Engineering from other college-level programs will have their academic records reviewed for advanced-standing credit only after they have been admitted and pay their tuition deposit. This determination will be made by the responsible academic department or program in accord with Swanson School of Engineering’s policy and criteria established by ABET, the engineering accrediting agency. In general, advanced standing for engineering or engineering science courses will be given only if the courses were taken from an ABET-accredited program and a grade of at least C has been earned. Courses that are taken on a pass/fail system that includes a D grade as passing will not be approved for advanced standing. Advanced standing for mathematics, science, humanities, and social sciences courses will be awarded to the extent that such courses match specific University of Pittsburgh Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences courses as required by the Swanson School of Engineering. In particular, humanities and social sciences courses must correspond to those on the Swanson School of Engineering’s approved list of humanities and social sciences electives. Contact the Swanson School for information on these approved electives.

No more than 90 total credits may be transferred from other colleges including a maximum of 60 credits from a two-year college. If 60 or more credits have been earned at a college or university, no transfer credit will be accepted for credits earned subsequently at a two-year school.

Additional transfer credit policies are as follows:

  1. Courses that have equivalent counterparts at Pitt in terms of content and credits in the Swanson School of Engineering curriculum are eligible for transfer.
  2. Transfer credits need to be earned within 12 years of the date when the Swanson School of Engineering degree requirements will be completed.
  3. In accordance with University policy, re-evaluation of credits will be done by the admitting school, when necessary, according to applicable University policy and procedure. The policy applies to all previous credits earned, no matter if they were earned at the University of Pittsburgh or another institution.
  4. If 60 or more credits have been earned at a four-year college or university, no transfer credit will be granted for credits earned subsequently at a two-year school.
  5. If a course for which advanced standing credit has been granted is repeated, the advanced standing credit is canceled.
  6. Coursework earned in approved foreign study programs will be awarded on a Satisfactory/No Credit (S/NC) basis assuming a grade of C or better has been earned.
  7. One credit taken at a quarter system school is equal to two-thirds a credit at the University of Pittsburgh. This may affect the ability of a course to transfer.  See #1.
  8. Engineering courses must be completed at an ABET certified institution with the exception of approved study abroad courses.
  9. Once a student is enrolled in the Swanson School of Engineering, he or she is no longer permitted to take courses at a two-year or community college for transfer credit.
  10. The Swanson School of Engineering does not accept CLEP credit for course credits.

Credits for students transferring from a college that has a 3/2 program articulation agreement with the Swanson School of Engineering (see Combined Liberal Arts-Engineering 3/2 Program), a community college having an articulation agreement with the Swanson School of Engineering, or a pre-engineering program at a University of Pittsburgh regional campus will be accepted in accord with those agreements, University policy, and available space in the program of interest.

If a student participates in the University of Pittsburgh College in High School Program, grades earned in Pitt CHS courses appear on an official University of Pittsburgh transcript and are part of the student’s academic record.  The grade(s) will be included in the calculation of the student’s grade point average at the University.  CHS courses are only eligible to be repeated at the University if the original grade was below C and no more than one year has passed since the original course was taken, per the Swanson School of Engineering Course Repeat policy.

Students enrolled in the Swanson School of Engineering may take courses at other universities to satisfy graduation requirements only if the student’s academic advisor or undergraduate coordinator has approved those courses in advance. Such courses must be taken at colleges or universities that offer full four-year degree programs. Engineering and engineering science courses must be taken at an ABET-approved engineering program. Students must earn a grade of C or higher for the course to be accepted for transfer credit. Students must arrange for their transcript to be sent to their undergraduate coordinator. As noted above, once a student is enrolled in the Swanson School of Engineering, he or she is no longer permitted to take courses at a two-year or community college for transfer credit.

Students may also earn advanced standing credit by taking Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes in their high schools. Students who have their AP or IB scores sent to the University of Pittsburgh will have those scores evaluated by an academic advisor, who will determine their transferability.

For more information on the IB, see the IB Score Information . For more information on the AP, see the AP Score Information .

Interdepartmental Transfers

A Swanson School of Engineering student whose academic record satisfies the minimum requirements for continued registration may apply for transfer from one engineering department or program to another. To initiate a change of program status, the student must complete a Program Change form, available at the Swanson School of Engineering Office of Administration. It is the prerogative of the department or program to which the student desires to transfer to approve or reject a change-of-status transfer request, based on academic performance and/or space limitations/availability.

Reinstatement

An engineering student in good academic standing who has not attended the University of Pittsburgh for three consecutive terms and has attended no other institution in the intervening period will be considered for reinstatement after making application to the department chair or program director. If the student has attended another institution and completed more than 12 credits, the student must reapply through the University’s Office of Admissions   and Financial Aid in accordance with the procedure for transfer applicants from other colleges or universities.

A student who has withdrawn while on academic probation may be reinstated only by action of the appropriate faculty committee, typically based upon substantial evidence of a positive change in the student’s attitude toward academic work. The student must initiate the request for reinstatement with the appropriate department chair or program director/head.

Grading Policies

The following section details the Swanson School of Engineering’s regulations regarding some of the grades that may appear on a student’s transcript. (For a complete discussion of all grades and grading options, see the Grading and Records section of this bulletin.)

G Grade (Incomplete)

An instructor may give the G grade when a student is unable to complete the work of a course during the term because of extenuating personal circumstances.

To remove a G grade, a student is expected to complete the course requirements within the next term of registration or within the time specified by the instructor. The instructor of the course will complete a Grade Change Authorization form and send it to the Swanson School of Engineering Office of Administration for processing. If the G grade is not made up in the time specified by the instructor, it may then be changed to the grade earned assuming no credit for the missing assignments/work. If a G grade is not removed within one year, it will be changed to NC (no credit).

S/NC Option

With the exception of undergraduate seminar courses, which are only offered satisfactory/no-credit (S/NC), the S/NC option cannot be used for any course that is used to meet graduation requirements. All other Swanson School of Engineering courses are only offered on a letter grade basis. This restriction includes humanities/social science electives and other science/engineering electives. First Year Students may not elect to take courses under the S/NC option. Upper-class engineering students man elect to take non-engineering courses that will not be used to meet graduation requirements as S/NC. Because S/NC courses are not considered in the calculation of the grade point average, the option is appropriate for students wishing to explore disciplines they might not otherwise pursue because of potential negative impact on the grade point average.

A student who wishes to take a course under the S/NC option should first consult his/her advisor to assure that the S/NC option is permissible. A student must register for and complete at least one course for a letter grade to be eligible for an S/NC option course in any term. To register for more than one S/NC option course per term, and a maximum of two, a student must register for 12 or more credits for letter grades.

Calculation of the Grade Point Average

Each credit carried for a letter grade is awarded quality points as noted under the Grading and Records section of this bulletin. A student’s term grade point average (term GPA) is the total quality points earned for the term divided by the total credits assigned letter grades. The cumulative grade point average (cumulative GPA) is determined by dividing the total number of quality points by the total number of credits assigned letter grades. Only credits and quality points for courses taken at the University of Pittsburgh and that count toward the requirement for the BSE degree are used in the calculation of the GPA.

Repeating Courses

The Swanson School of Engineering permits a student to repeat courses in which grades below C were received. A student may not repeat a course more than twice. If the course is repeated within one academic year following the original registration, the original credits and quality points of these repeated courses will not be included in the student’s cumulative GPA. All grades earned in the repeated course will be posted to the academic record even if the repeated course grade is lower than the original grade. Also note that a sequence course cannot be repeated and have the grade replaced if a succeeding course in that sequence has been taken (e.g., MATH 0220, 0230, and 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1, 2, and 3; PHYS 0174 and 0175 Basic Physics for Science and Engineering 1 and 2). The same course repeat rules will apply to transfer students from the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, the College of General Studies, and the regional campuses.

Students may only repeat a course twice. Any student who fails to successfully complete a required course three times will be dismissed from the Swanson School even if his or her GPA is 2.000 or higher.

Honors Lists

At the end of each term, the academic records of all undergraduate degree students in the Swanson School of Engineering are reviewed to determine eligibility for the Term Honor List and the Dean’s Honor List. Students who qualify for both honor lists will appear only on the Dean’s Honor List.

Term Honor List

To be eligible for the Term Honor List, a student must

  • Earn a GPA of at least 3.250,
  • Complete a minimum of 15 credits of academic work for letter grades at the University of Pittsburgh, and
  • Complete a minimum of 6 credits of work for letter grades in the term of eligibility.

Dean’s Honor List

To be eligible for the Dean’s Honor List, a student must

  • Earn cumulative and term GPA’s of 3.250 or higher,
  • Complete a minimum of 30 credits of academic work for letter grades at the University of Pittsburgh, and
  • Complete a minimum of 6 credits of work for letter grades in the term of eligibility.

Credits

In the Swanson School of Engineering, a credit or credit hour is one of the following:

  • One hour of lecture or recitation a week, requiring two hours of outside preparation
  • Two hours of laboratory a week, requiring one hour of outside preparation
  • Three hours of laboratory a week, requiring no outside preparation

Registration

Each student registers for future terms with the assistance of his or her academic advisor during registration periods specified by the Office of the University Registrar. A student who has registered for a course but has failed to satisfy the prerequisites for that course prior to the beginning of the term may not be permitted to continue attending class and must withdraw from the course if requested to do so. First Year engineering students register for the fall term during the summer advising sessions. All entering students are required to take the ALEKS Math placement exam before registering for their first Math class at the University of Pittsburgh, regardless of advanced standing credit (AP, IB, transfer credit) or prior ALEKS experience.

Maximum Credit Registration

All full-time undergraduate engineering students are expected to register for a normal full term of academic courses (i.e., at least 12 credits). No student shall be allowed to register for more than 18 credits without specific written permission from his/her academic advisor and approval by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Such permission is given only after a review of the student’s academic record in order to verify that an overload is academically justifiable. All credits above 18 for undergraduates will be billed over and above the full-time tuition rate at the prevailing per-credit tuition charge.

Registration for Graduate Credit

A Swanson School of Engineering undergraduate student requiring fewer than 15 credits to complete the requirements for the baccalaureate degree and who intends to continue study toward an advanced degree may be permitted during their final term to register for graduate courses that will later apply toward a graduate degree. The student must obtain written permission from the school of proposed graduate study that the courses may count when and if the student is admitted into the graduate program. Although these credits will appear on the undergraduate transcript, they will not count toward fulfilling undergraduate degree requirements. They will be posted as advanced standing credits on the graduate record.

Statute of Limitations

All required academic work for the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree, including courses for which advanced-standing credit has been granted, must be completed within 12 consecutive calendar years. Under unusual circumstances, a student may, with the approval of the department or program chair, request a waiver of this policy. This policy means that part-time students must progress toward the degree at a minimum rate of 12 credits per calendar year.

Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate with a BSE, a student must have satisfactorily completed all degree requirements and earned the total number of credits required by the department or program in which the student is enrolled. The student must also have obtained a minimum GPA of 2.000 for (a) all required courses completed at the University of Pittsburgh and (b) all program courses.

The work of the senior year (a minimum of 24 credits) should be completed while in residence at the Swanson School of Engineering. Exceptions will be granted for students to take a limited number of credits needed to complete their degree, or through participation in an approved study abroad program. Such requests must be approved in advance by the appropriate undergraduate coordinator, chair or Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

(See the Graduation section  of this catalog for further information on graduation requirements and procedures.)

Academic Integrity and Code of Conduct

The integrity of the academic process requires fair and impartial evaluation on the part of faculty and honest academic conduct on the part of students. Students are expected to conduct themselves with a high level of responsibility in the fulfillment of their course of study and their conduct in and out of the classroom. It is the corresponding responsibility of faculty to make clear to students those standards by which they will be evaluated and the resources permissible for use by students during their course of study. The educational process is perceived as a joint faculty-student enterprise that will involve professional judgment by faculty and may involve, without penalty, reasoned exception by students to the data or views offered by faculty. Consistent with these considerations (and without limiting their scope and application in their entirety to the academic programs of the University), faculty and students are directed to observe established University of Pittsburgh and Swanson School of Engineering guidelines on academic integrity and code of conduct. Copies of both the Swanson School of Engineering and the University of Pittsburgh Guidelines on Academic Integrity are available to faculty and students in the departmental offices of the Swanson School of Engineering and is also available by Policy Guidelines - SSOE .  The University’s student Code of Conduct is available at: http://www.studentaffairs.pitt.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016_Code_of_Conduct_Nov4.pdf

Assessment

As part of the Swanson School of Engineering’s commitment to student learning and academic achievement, effective teaching, and continuous improvement of our programs, we regularly conduct outcomes assessment activities. To obtain periodic measurements of student perceptions and intellectual growth, students will be expected to participate in surveys, focus groups, interviews, and related activities. While individual input is collected, the data resulting from these assessments will be published only in aggregate form.

Advising

All students are assigned an advisor and are expected to meet with their advisor prior to registration. The First Year Engineering Program’s professional staff serves as first year advisors. Throughout the freshman year, students are encouraged to meet with their advisor if they need to register for classes, withdraw from classes, add and/or drop classes, seek out resources, find out about their academic progress, discuss problems they are having in a course, or get help deciding on a program. First Year Students are also assigned a peer advisor from the Freshman Engineering Leadership Team, with whom they will meet weekly in the fall term. Once students are admitted to a department or program, they are then assigned a faculty advisor. Students who wish to change advisors should meet with the department chair, program director, or undergraduate coordinator to request a change.

Continuing Undeclared Engineering Students will be advised by staff in the First-Year Engineering program (in collaboration with the Engineering programs) until they are department-ready.  Students are considered Continuing Undeclared Engineering Students if they meet any of the following criteria:

  • have yet to successfully completed more than one First-Year Engineering course
  • have a cumulative GPA below 2.000
  • have a grade of C- or lower in MATH 0230  (Calculus 2)
  • have yet to successfully complete a critical class for their intended major, as follows:

General Degree Requirements

The degree requirements are established by the individual departments and programs. Depending on the program, between 126 to 135 credits may be required for the individual degree. Each program’s requirements include the common freshman year, a mathematics sequence (four or five courses depending on the program), and six approved humanities and social science electives (including the W-course requirement). The specific degree requirements are found in the program descriptions below.

Humanities and Social Science Requirement

An important part of the undergraduate engineering student’s education is the humanities and social science component. All Swanson School of Engineering undergraduates must complete at least six humanities and social science elective courses from the school’s approved list of Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences (A&S) courses, while meeting the school and ABET requirements for breadth and depth. To meet the depth requirement, a student must complete two or more courses in the same area of study only one of which can be considered an introductory course from the Dietrich School including both humanities and social sciences courses. The depth requirement can also be satisfied by taking two or more courses with a related theme, e.g., courses that focus on a geographic region, historic period, or ideological perspective. For the breadth requirements, it is recommended that the courses include approved offerings from at least three different departments from Arts and Sciences. Students may use one study abroad course that might not otherwise be counted toward satisfying this requirement.

No more than two of the required six elective courses can be satisfied through foreign language courses and the language may not be the student’s mother tongue.

No more than two of the required six elective courses can be satisfied via high school Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and/or GCE-A-Level credits.

Students must also complete one W-designated course; i.e., a course that has a substantial writing component that has been so designated by the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences (A&S). Depending on the course, it may also count as one of the humanities/social science electives. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs maintains a list of approved humanities and social science electives. Students are not permitted to use College of General Studies courses including those indicated as either hybrid, self-paced, or online web courses.

Writing-Designated Course (W Course) Requirement

Engineering students must demonstrate an ability to communicate effectively. This includes both written and oral communication and the ability to make professional presentations. Upon admission, students with an SAT Critical Reading score below 500 will be required to take at least one English Composition Course during their first year that will not count toward the Swanson School of Engineering graduation requirements.

All students must take at least one W course as part of their humanities/social science requirements. Please note that students may also satisfy the W requirement by taking a science course with a writing component. In addition, each engineering program has substantial communications components throughout the curriculum. Some programs require a specific course in communications. It is important to refer to each program’s graduation requirements to identify requisite communication courses.

For students planning on a dual degree from the Swanson School of Engineering and a Dietrich School major, it is important to note the following: The University of Pittsburgh Composition Program has agreed that the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences composition requirement is satisfied by students taking ENGR 0011  and ENGR 0012  through the First Year Engineering Writing Program.

Online Courses

Undergraduate engineering students may take one humanities/social science and one engineering, engineering science, math or science course online subject to the following conditions:

  1. Student must present a valid reason for taking the course.
  2. The course must be from a four-year college or university that is accredited by Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools (or equivalent if outside the region).
  3. In addition, an engineering or engineering science course must be from an ABET accredited program.
  4. The humanities/social science courses must be from the arts and science unit of the institution and not from a continuing education, or general studies unit. The course must be taught in English.
  5. The course must be first approved by the undergraduate coordinator and then by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Major and Degree Options

The following majors (described in the Program Descriptions section) within the Swanson School of Engineering offers the Bachelor of Science in Engineering:

  • Bioengineering
  • Chemical engineering
  • Civil engineering (administered through the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
  • Computer engineering (administered through the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Computer Science, A&S)
  • Electrical engineering (administered through the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering)
  • Engineering Science (administered through the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science)
  • Environmental Engineering (administered through the Department of Civil Engineering)
  • Industrial engineering
  • Materials science and engineering (administered through the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science)
  • Mechanical engineering (administered through the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science)

Minors in Engineering

The Swanson School of Engineering offers a number of minors to its students who wish to expand their field of knowledge in engineering. Engineering students may also pursue a minor from a Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences program (see A&S section of this bulletin for details on the minors offered within A&S). Engineering students are not permitted to minor in the same field in which they are majoring. Students from outside the Swanson School of Engineering may pursue one of these minors with the permission of the administering program. Any student interested in a minor should consult with the given department to determine the eligibility and completion requirements for each minor. The minors offered by the school are as follows:

  • Bioengineering
  • Chemical engineering
  • Civil engineering
  • Electrical engineering
  • Environmental engineering
  • Industrial engineering
  • Materials science and engineering
  • Mechanical engineering
  • Petroleum engineering
  • Polymer engineering

Certificates Programs

Swanson School of Engineering undergraduate students are encouraged to broaden their educational experience by electing to take one of the certificate programs currently offered by Arts and Sciences, the University Center for International Studies (UCIS), or the Swanson School of Engineering. These certificate programs may be used by the engineering student to partially fulfill the humanities/social sciences requirement, thereby allowing specialization in an area of interest while pursuing an engineering degree. The requirements for each certificate vary, and students should contact the appropriate certificate program director.

The Swanson School of Engineering offers a number certificates at the undergraduate level:

  • Engineering for Humanity Certificate 
  • Engineering Simulation in Design Certificate 
  • Health Systems Engineering Certificate 
  • Innovation, Product Design, and Entrepreneurship Certificate 
  • International Engineering Studies Certificate 
  • Mining Engineering Certificate 
  • Nuclear Engineering Certificate 
  • Supply Chain Management Certificate 
  • Sustainable Engineering Certificate 

In addition to certificates offered by the Swanson School of Engineering, additional certificates are available from other schools within the University, such as the one listed below.

  • Engineering-School of Education Certification Program

The Swanson School of Engineering realizes the need to provide program flexibility and a variety of career options to undergraduate engineering majors. Careers in the teaching of mathematics, chemistry, and physics present one such option to students who have acquired a knowledge base in engineering. Through an articulated agreement with the University of Pittsburgh School of Education, a five-year Program of Study combines course work in engineering with Content Core Studies for the teaching of chemistry, mathematics, or physics; additionally, general education courses and pre-educational professional credits are included in the program. During the program’s fifth year (after completion of the BS in engineering degree), students will complete the requirements for the Instructional I Certificate in their area of choice. This two-term program will enable them to teach in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

For more information regarding scheduling and the admission policy of the agreement, talk with your advisor, or call 412-648-2230 to schedule a pre-admission meeting with a School of Education representative. See also http://www.education.pitt.edu/programs/certificates.aspx

Special Academic Opportunities/Programs

The Swanson School of Engineering offers numerous special academic opportunities as detailed in the following pages:

Arts and Sciences-Engineering Dual Degree Program

The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences (A&S) and the Swanson School of Engineering have developed an undergraduate dual degree program that permits a student to combine a major in arts and sciences with a program in engineering and then receive degrees from both A&S and the Swanson School of Engineering. A student can apply for admission into this program through either A&S or the Swanson School of Engineering and must be admitted into both schools.

While the form of the program is dependent upon the individual student’s interests, the first year’s curriculum is typically the standard engineering program. During the next three years the student may complete the specific requirements for his or her engineering degree while fulfilling certain A&S major and general education requirements. Typically, the fifth year is then used to complete the A&S requirements. Students must complete a minimum of 90 A&S credits, including all A&S skills and general education requirements and an A&S major (but not a related area). Students must also complete all the degree requirements of their chosen engineering program, usually consisting of 70 or more Swanson School of Engineering credits. Each program should be developed with an advisor in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences and an advisor in the Swanson School of Engineering and tailored to the student’s special interests. Students in this program have combined engineering with neuroscience, philosophy, economics, music, and a number of the language programs.

Students must satisfy both schools’ normal progress requirements and criteria for academic standing as long as they remain in the joint degree program. Students also must apply for graduation from both schools. A&S students earn either a BA or BS degree, depending upon the A&S program of study. The student’s GPA for graduation from A&S is calculated based solely upon the credits earned for the A&S degree. For further information, students may contact one of the following: the First Year Engineering Program Office, 152 Benedum Hall; an engineering departmental undergraduate coordinator; the A&S Office, 140 Thackeray Hall; the A&S Advising Center, 252 Thackeray Hall; or the University Honors College engineering advisor, 3600 Cathedral of Learning.

Bachelor of Philosophy Degree Program with University Honors College

Undergraduate students with exceptional academic ability and motivation may elect to complete the Bachelor of Philosophy degree program in addition to their engineering bachelor of science degree. Students who have completed the freshman year may apply for degree candidacy in the University Honors College (UHC). Outstanding students enrolled in any of the Swanson School of Engineering programs may elect to complete these interschool degree requirements. In addition, students pursuing the five-year joint degree program with Arts and Sciences are also encouraged to pursue the honors college degree.

All of the UHC degree programs require independent scholarship and a competency-based evaluation by faculty in the last year. The requirements for independent scholarship entail the completion and defense of a thesis during the junior and senior years. Qualified engineering students may join with an engineering faculty member to propose an individualized plan of study leading to independent scholarship and an honors college degree, provided the basic graduation requirements of the student’s engineering department are fulfilled. Students interested in the honors college should contact the dean of the honors college, 3500 Cathedral of Learning, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, or call 412-624-6880. (See the University Honors College section of this bulletin.)

Architecture Design Minor (Offered by History of Art and Architecture in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences)

Those working in many aspects of Civil Engineering, particularly in structural engineering and other building sciences, work intimately with architects. The Minor in Architecture - Design provides an opportunity for students to obtain experience and understanding of various aspects of the architecture profession. Students engage in two studio courses (HAA 1913 and 1916 ) and HAA 0940 Approaches to the Built Environment and at least one additional HAA elective. The requirements of the Minor are used to partially satisfy SSOE humanities requirements and HAA 1916 satisfies one 3 credit CEE elective requirement. Due to the nature of the Architecture - Design Minor, students must generally begin in their first year or sophomore year. This Minor is administered through the History of Art and Architecture Department (HAA). For more information visit Department of History of Art and Architecture. However, SSOE students wishing to pursue this Minor are advised to contact Dr. Kent Harries in CEE before applying for this Minor. Dr. Harries is located in 218B Benedum Hall, email: kharries@pitt.edu or call 412-624-9873 in CEE before applying for this Minor.

Cooperative Engineering Education Program

The school’s Cooperative Engineering Education Program enhances the student engineer’s educational experience through a series of challenging, highly relevant “real world” work sessions. This is accomplished by integrating a rotation of school and employment terms that enables the cooperative education student to complement his or her formal classroom training with additional technical knowledge, hands-on experience, and financial remuneration. The co-op graduate possesses the maturity and assurance of a more seasoned employee and the ability to incorporate academic knowledge and theory into practice. During co-op sessions, students earn competitive salaries, which also makes this program financially rewarding. Almost half of the graduating seniors complete the co-op program requirements. Through the assistance of the Swanson School of Engineering’s Cooperative Education Office, formal arrangements are established with industry that permit students to rotate four-month terms between the workplace and the classroom. At the University of Pittsburgh, this rotation begins during either the sophomore or junior year and extends into the senior year, with the co-op student completing at least three four-month work periods. These employment sessions, which are typically with the same employer, allow job duties to increase as the knowledge and skills of the student engineer progress. The positions can be local, national, or international. This practical work experience has also been found to increase academic motivation and classroom performance. Co-op students become aware of business practice and etiquette and possess a mature, responsible attitude. Thus, upon graduation, students who have successfully completed the three co-op rotations are able to handle more challenging initial assignments with confidence and assurance. A high percentage of co-op students also obtain and accept full-time offers from their co-op employers. Keep in mind that students who are on co-op rotations are unable to simultaneously hold employment positions as student workers or federal work study positions during that semester.

Students earn transcript certification and a total of three credits towards departmental graduation requirements upon satisfactory completion of the program requirements. The co-op program offers resume preparation, interviewing skills, workshops and job fairs in order to facilitate appropriate placements for students.

Sample Co-op Schedules

SCHEDULE A
Fall
(Sept.-Dec.)
Spring
(Jan.-April)
Summer
(May-Aug.)
First Year School School  
Second Year School School  
Third Year Work School Work
Fourth Year School Work School
Fifth Year School    

 

SCHEDULE B
Fall
(Sept.-Dec.)
Spring
(Jan.-April)
Summer
(May-Aug.)
First Year School School  
Second Year School School Work
Third Year School Work School
Fourth Year Work School Work
Fifth Year School    

 

SCHEDULE C
Fall
(Sept.-Dec.)
Spring
(Jan.-April)
Summer
(May-Aug.)
First Year School School  
Second Year School Work School
Third Year Work School Work
Fourth Year School Work School
Fifth Year School    

For more information, please contact:

University of Pittsburgh
Swanson School of Engineering
Cooperative Engineering Education Program
152 Benedum Hall
Pittsburgh, PA  15260
412-624-9826
paub2m@pitt.edu
www.engineering.pitt.edu/coop/

Engineering International Programs

As the world around us grows ever more connected, it is evident that engineering students must be prepared to engage in an increasingly globalized world, and, upon graduation, to compete in an international job market. Accordingly, the Swanson School of Engineering has placed a strong emphasis on the development of exciting and academically enriching international programs for its students.

All students in SSOE are encouraged to add a global dimension to their education by pursuing one or more international programs as part of their academic study. At present, SSOE students may elect to participate in study, research, co-op, internship, or service learning abroad. Most of these opportunities are offered on a for-credit basis, and many can be used to satisfy major, minor, technical elective, or other degree requirements. Foreign language study is helpful, but not required, as many courses are on offer in English. Depending on their academic and personal interests, students may elect to participate in dozens of individual international programs. Some of these may last for only a week or two, either during spring break or over the summer term. Others may involve a commitment of a semester or even an entire academic year abroad.

The Swanson Signature Study Abroad Programs are short term opportunities that focus on a relevant engineering topic in detail over the course of 10 to 14 days, to up to five weeks. Recently, Swanson Signature programs have occurred in Brazil, Uruguay, Peru, Italy and Germany, studying such diverse topics as renewable energy and sustainability, engineering of pre-Columbian civilizations, and global supply networks. Plus3 is another innovative short term program designed for first year SSOE students, and which has gone to such locations as Italy, Germany, Costa Rica, China, and Viet Nam. Meanwhile, students who wish to invest in longer term language or cultural study may decide to participate in an exchange program. This affords them the opportunity to study engineering, social sciences or humanities at a foreign college or university for one or two consecutive academic terms, and for little more than the cost of a regular term in Pittsburgh. Finally, scholarships and other funding opportunities are also available, and financial aid administered by the University of Pittsburgh may apply.

Current and prospective SSOE students and their parents are welcome to contact the Office of Engineering International Programs for more information.

University of Pittsburgh
Swanson School of Engineering
Office of Engineering International Programs
152 Benedum Hall
3700 O’Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA  15261
412-624-9825
http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/international/

Combined Liberal Arts-Engineering 3/2 Program

The Swanson School of Engineering has developed combined liberal arts/engineering dual degree programs with a number of accredited liberal arts colleges. In these “3/2 programs,” students first complete a three-year structured course of study at the liberal arts college, including that college’s general education requirements, specific introductory courses required for the engineering program of interest, and other courses necessary for acceptance into a Swanson School of Engineering program. With the recommendation of the faculty advisor at the liberal arts college, the student applies for transfer to the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering, spending the final two or more years in an engineering program. Such programs typically enable the student to earn both a liberal arts degree and an engineering degree.  For additional information, please contact the Coordinator of Transfer Student Services.

University of Pittsburgh
Swanson School of Engineering
First Year Engineering Program
Coordinator of Transfer Student Services
152 Benedum Hall
3700 O’Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA  15261
412-624-9825
ssoefrsh@pitt.edu

Swanson School of Engineering-Diversity Initiatives

The Engineering Office of Diversity exists to create and sustain learning and working environments where differences and similarities are valued and respected, and all students, especially underrepresented students, are included and empowered to excel in engineering education. The office provides diversity education to undergraduates, graduate students, staff and faculty. The office also provides continuous academic and community support services through the its pre-college, undergraduate and graduate student programming.

Pre-College and Undergraduate Diversity Programs

The Swanson School of Engineering pre-college and undergraduate diversity programs develop and implement activities that promote and support the academic excellence of high achieving pre-college and undergraduate students from groups historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. These initiatives provide a continuous pipeline for students to prepare for, enter and graduate from the University of Pittsburgh as STEM majors.

INVESTING NOW

INVESTING NOW, created in 1988, is a college preparatory program created to stimulate, support, and recognize the high academic performance of pre-college students from historically underrepresented groups. The purpose of this program is to expose high achieving students to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers and prepare them to be successful at the University of Pittsburgh or other highly competitive universities.

The program’s primary goals are to:

  1. Create a pipeline for well-prepared students to enter college and pursue science, technology, engineering and mathematics majors;
  2. Encourage and support student’ enrollment and achievement in advanced mathematics and science courses;
  3. Ensure that the participants make informed college choices;
  4. Support and encourage parents in their role as advocates for their children; and
  5. Coordinate partnerships between the University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering and local and regional schools.

Membership in INVESTING NOW a student’s commitment to attend year-round programming from ninth through twelfth grade.

For further information, contact:

University of Pittsburgh
Swanson School of Engineering
INVESTING NOW
152C Benedum Hall
3700 O’Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA  15261
412-624-0224
http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/InvestingNow/

Pitt EXCEL Program

Pitt EXCEL is a comprehensive diversity program committed to the recruitment, retention and graduation of academically excellent engineering undergraduates, particularly individuals from groups historically underrepresented in the field. Program activities include academic counseling, peer mentoring, engineering research opportunities, graduate school preparation and career development workshops, as well as a two-week intensive study skills, math and science review session for pre-first year students.

The goals of the Pitt EXCEL programs are to:

  1. Collaborate with the INVESTING NOW program, the First Year Engineering Program Office and the Office of Admissions & Financial Aid in order to increase the number of students from underrepresented groups enrolled in the Swanson School of Engineering.
  2. Provide students with support activities and enrichment opportunities that will make them marketable to corporations and graduate schools.
  3. Provide community building activities that will help students to develop a supportive and diverse peer network.

Programming offered to Pitt EXCEL students includes:

The Summer Engineering Academy (SEA) is a residential program that enables students to make a smooth transition from high school to college. During SEA, students learn essential study skills for college and receive an intensive review of chemistry, pre-calculus and physics concepts, with an introduction to engineering problem solving. By attending this program students can prepare for success during their first year of college.

Summer Research Internships (SRI) focuses on the preparation of underrepresented students for graduate education and professional careers in engineering. The goals of the program are to identify motivated students and match them with faculty mentors. The mentors assist the students through the completion of a summer research project.

For further information, please contact:

University of Pittsburgh
Swanson School of Engineering
Pitt EXCEL Program
152C Benedum Hall
3700 O’Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA  15261
Phone: 412-624-9625
Fax: 412-624-2827
http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/EXCEL/

Global Engineering Preparedness Scholarship (GEPS) Programs

Educating Engineers in Cultural and Societal Contexts

Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering and its Office of Diversity (EOD) have established the Global Engineering Preparedness Scholarship program (GEPS). GEPS helps to support the recruitment, retention and graduation of low-income students from underrepresented minorities and majority populations. GEPS also prepares students for the global marketplace by offering international opportunities that students would not normally be able to participate without additional supporting funds.

Because the engineering career of the 21st century is more globally competitive than ever, GEPS also provides an integrative framework that focuses on access, continuous academic support, development of global competency and leadership experience. International experience is now an integral part of engineering education, and highly sought after by employers across all engineering disciplines. GEPS Scholars will have access to Pitt’s exceptional education abroad programs to experience international skills sought by the engineering profession.

GEPS Benefits

  • Academic Counseling and Advising -Structured on-on-one academic counseling and advising for all first-year students. Students will meet with an Academic Counselor regularly, as well as with the Associate Dean for Diversity at the beginning of each semester to set goals and at the end of each semester to review goal attainment.
  • Academic Living/learning Community (ALC): All GEPS Scholars participate in ALC program activities in the first year at Pitt. This provides Scholars the opportunity to live and learn from each other and develop and cultivate cross-cultural lifelong friendships.
  • Academic Tutoring - Tutoring support will be provided for all GEPS Scholars in physics, chemistry and math courses through the EXCEL office.
  • Faculty Mentoring: Students will be matched with faculty who will engage in a professional one-on-one relationship to further challenge students in scholarly activities.
  • Global Leadership Competency Development for Engineers (GLE) - After the first year, Scholars will participate in GLE activities designed to enrich global leadership experience and global preparedness. GLE activities are supported through partnerships with employers, international study abroad, and career development programs, allowing Scholars to engage in engineering design and problem solving in cultural and societal contexts, both at home and abroad.  In Summer 2017, 14 GEPS Scholars successfully participated in the first GLE Study Abroad Program that provided the students with an introduction to global preparedness in the context of product ideation, design, and development in the U.S. and internationally.
  • Peer Mentoring: GEPS will provide a more structured and effective peer mentoring program by pairing GEPS first-year students with Engineering Ambassadors selected from a group of outstanding engineering juniors and seniors. The Engineering Ambassadors will help students develop good study skills, capacity building skills, and communication skills critical during the first year at the Swanson School.
  • Summer Engineering Academy (SEA): A rigorous two-week pre-college program designed to assist students in making a smooth transition from high school to college.

Scholarship Eligibility, Selection, and Retention

GEPS Scholars will be selected from the pool of admitted students or transferring students meeting US citizenship or permanent residency requirements and having unmet financial needs as determined through the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid. Student should be in to top 10-20 percent of class high school ranking, ACT/SAT above 27/1300, or college transfer GPA of 3.000 or above.

Beyond scores and academic performance students are offered GEPS admission by committee review of GPA, SAT/ACT scores, strength of high school courses, class ranking, teacher recommendations for overall potential for success, extracurricular activities, honors and awards, professionalism, leadership, and personal statement.

All GEPS Scholars must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.000 to retain the Scholarship. All GEPS Scholars who complete the second year of the program with GPA of 3.000 and above are eligible for the GEPS International Study Abroad Scholarship.

For more information contact:

University of Pittsburgh
Swanson School of Engineering
Engineering Office of Diversity
128 Benedum Hall
3700 O’Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15261
eodadmin@pitt.edu
412-624-9842

Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate - Tranistion to the Doctorate by Adaptalbe Engagement (PITT - STRIVE)

The University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering Transition to the Doctorate by Adaptable Engagement (PITT- STRIVE) is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate-Knowledge Adoption and Translation (AGEP-KAT). 

The primary goals of PITT-STRIVE are to (a) significantly increase the number of underrepresented minorities (i.e., African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians or other Pacific Islanders) obtaining graduate degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and (b) enhance the preparation of underrepresented minorities for faculty positions in academia.

The overarching goals of PITT-STRIVE at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering are to:

  • Improve the transition of URM (African/Black American, Hispanic/Latino Americans, Native Americans) students, who are US citizens, into doctoral engineering programs at the University of Pittsburgh; and
  • Create a systemic engineering culture and climate that ensures the success of URM transition to the doctorate through adoption/adaptation of evidence-based strategies for student and faculty engagement.

Student Objectives:

  1. Adapt and implement evidence-based strategies with URM doctoral student participants in engineering, who are US citizens.
  2. Enhance professional and educational skills of URM doctoral student participants in engineering, who are US citizens.
  3. Increase the number of URM doctoral student participants, who are US citizens, to continue and maintain an interest in the engineering PhD program.

Faculty Objectives:

  1. Improve faculty engagement with URM graduate students, who are US citizens in engineering.
  2. Improve faculty awareness of the problems facing URM graduate students who are US citizens in engineering.
  3. Develop a shared vision among vested faculty regarding the success of URM graduate students within the school of engineering.

Program Outcomes from Achieving the Goals:

The framework to accomplish these goals is built around four adaptable priorities with focus placed upon improving the role of faculty and academic culture/climate that support the success of URM PhDs in engineering to achieve the following outcomes: 1) Improve faculty engagement with URM students; 2) Improve faculty awareness of impediments to URM success in SSoE PhD program; and 3) Promote a shared vision among vested faculty regarding the success of URM students within our School of Engineering, and 4) achieve systemic inclusive academic culture and climate that support the success of URM doctoral students.

PITT-STRIVE scholars are recruited from universities across the U.S., and students must meet U.S. citizenship or permanent residency requirements. Qualified participants will have graduated from an accredited STEM undergraduate program with a 3.300 GPA and show strong motivation for entering a PhD program. All PITT - STRIVE Scholars must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.300 to maintain the award. Activities associated with PITT-STRIVE include a mentor/mentee weekend retreat; the Discover Graduate Recruitment Weekend; faculty-student engagement training; and the faculty-student engagement training.

PITT-STRIVE is part of the National Science Foundation’s Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP).

For more information on PITT STRIVE please visit http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/diversity/agep/

For more information contact:

University of Pittsburgh
Swanson School of Engineering
Engineering Office of Diversity
PITT STRIVE Program Coordinator
129A Benedum Hall
3700 O’Hara Street
Pittsburgh PA 15261
agepadmin@pitt.edu
412-624-2118

Other SSOE Diversity Initiatives:

First Year Diversity Workshop

Freshman Diversity Workshop is considered mandatory for all First Year engineering students. It provides the attendees with diversity awareness skills and explains the broad meaning of diversity and what it contributes to the personal, professional, and social improvement.

Graduate Diversity Workshop

Graduate Diversity Workshop is considered mandatory for all graduate students in their first year of the program. It discusses principles of intercultural communication and acceptable classroom and research group behaviors.

Diversity Professional Development Workshops

During Fall and Spring semesters, the Engineering Office of Diversity and PITT STRIVE program organize series of workshops that allow the campus community to meet the leading experts in diversity-related issues and initiatives. The Engineering Office of Diversity and PITT STRIVE program also organize seminars and workshops dedicated to such nationally recognized celebrations as Hispanic Heritage Month, Black History Month, Women History Months, etc.    

For more information contact:

University of Pittsburgh
Swanson School of Engineering
Engineering Office of Diversity
128B Benedum Hall
3700 O’Hara Street
Pittsburgh PA 15261
eodadmin@pitt.edu
412-624-9842
http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/diversity/

Swanson School of Engineering Faculty

School of Engineering Faculty  

Program and Course Offerings

Students enter one of the specific engineering major programs below at the sophomore level after successfully completing the First-Year Student Engineering Program .

Degree Programs in BS in Engineering

Bioengineering  
Chemical Engineering   
Civil Engineering   
Computer Engineering   
Electrical Engineering  
Engineering Science  
Environmental Engineering   
Industrial Engineering   
Materials Science and Engineering   
Mechanical Engineering  

Certificate Programs

Engineering for Humanity Certificate   
Engineering Simulation in Design Certificate   
Health Systems Engineering Certificate  
Innovation, Product Design, and Entrepreneurship Certificate   
International Engineering Studies Certificate   
Mining Engineering Certificate   
Nuclear Engineering Certificate   
Supply Chain Management Certificate   
Sustainability Certificate  

Programs

Major

Certificate

Department of Bioengineering

Go to information for this department.

Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

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Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

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Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

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Department of Industrial Engineering

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Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

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